When you use antibiotics you affect the lives of others

The Government of Canada announced this week that farmers – from the small farm to the increasingly prevalent industrial scale “factory farms” – will need a prescription before they can use antibiotics on their food-producing animals. The new rule takes effect this coming December.

Ottawa grounds the need for the rule on:

[T]he emergence of so-called ‘superbugs’ … one of the most significant health threats to Canadians.… [where] The overuse or inappropriate use of antibiotics contributes to the development of [antibiotic resistance] in people and animals. Examples [of inappropriate use] include giving antibiotics to … animals when they are not needed.

Targeting agriculture stops the disease threat at its source. As the chart below demonstrates, bad bugs created on the farm make their way through the environment into your home and community.

Notice the fine print: the use of antibiotics by one person (or group) can adversely affect the health of another person because (1) antibiotics give rise to harder to treat illness and (2) the antibiotics themselves become less effective over time.

No other drug does this. For example, taking aspirin, insulin, or hypertension medication only affects the person taking them and the drugs retain their potency over generations.

Commenting on the government’s new rule and the unique societal feature of antibiotics, John Prescott, retired professor of pathobiology at the University of Guelph, told the CBC that “Farmers need to see this as part of their societal obligation. They need to understand why it’s being done, accept it, embrace it and work with it.”

Prescott notes that it’s not just farmers who have this obligation to others to use antibiotics appropriately: “Everybody has to reduce their use of antibiotics to preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics. This is agriculture stepping up to the plate.” (Emphasis added.)

Livestock 3

 

 

 

 

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